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207 South State Street
Salt Lake City, Utah
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Dreamland Theatre
Ogden, Utah

Charles and George Driskell were managers of the Dreamland Theatre on Washington Avenue for most of 1908.   They made improvements to the playhouse in March, including the addition of landscape panels on the walls made by local artists.   In August, the Dreamland added a second projector, eliminating the need for intermissions at reel changes.   A claim by George Driskell that he had “worked with untiring energy” to secure exclusive engagements at the Dreamland provoked a strong response from R. W. Strong with 20th Century Optiscope, who claimed the entire credit for resolving booking conflicts lay with the national Film Service Association.   Two months later, the Dreamland reopened under the management of Fred Tout and Fred Anderson.

 
 
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Newspaper ad for the Photo Player Theater.

Salt Lake Tribune, page 14
Date: 4 April 1926

Photo Play Theatre
(Liberty Theatre)
 
207 South State Street
Salt Lake City, Utah
 
Status:
Demolished 
Open:
Before 1927  
Closed:
After April 1929  
 

The Photo Play Theatre opened sometime before April 1926. It was unique in the 1920s because its newspaper advertisements included the theater's address, 207 South State Street.[1] This was mostly likely to distinguish it from the former Photoplay Theatre on Main Street.

Thales M. Derrick, an auctioneer, took over management of the theater by September 1928. The theater had been renamed the Liberty and boasted “New Management, Newly Decorated, Good Music”.[2]

The Liberty Theatre appeared in the Salt Lake Tribune classified ads in November 1928: “Moving Picture Theater: Newly decorated; going fine; at 207 So. State St. Will sell very reasonable for cash, or trade for home. Must sell, account other business taking all my time. This is a real money-maker and will pay you to see it.”[3]

The theater was scheduled for an auction “as a going business” on 29 April 1929, due to the “owner's poor health.” In the advertisement, auctioneer Col. E. C., Jenkins asked, “ Have you a little money? Do you want a good paying business? If so, see me...”[4]

 

1. Newspaper advertisement, Salt Lake Tribune, 4 April 1926, page 14. See also, Salt Lake City Classified Business Directory, Summer 1926, Summer 1929
2. Newspaper advertisement, Salt Lake Tribune, 30 September 1928, page 11
3. "Classified Ad", Salt Lake Tribune, 11 November 1928, page 10. See also: “Classified Ad”, Salt Lake Tribune, 25 November 1928, Page 11
4. “Classified Ad”, Salt Lake Tribune, 28 April 1929, page 2