utahtheaters.info
 
  •Home •Theaters •News •Recent  
 
Young's Theatre
275 South Main Street
Monticello, Utah
•Main Page •News Articles (4)
•Photos
•Sign Guestbook
•Facts & Figures  

Isis Theater
Salt Lake City, Utah

Open in 1908, the Isis Theatre was one of the first motion picture theaters in Salt Lake City.  Its manager in 1910 was Max Florence, who a year later tried to blackmail the LDS Church by selling amateur photos of the Salt Lake Temple interior.  Dan Kostopulos, a benefactor of underprivileged children, later renamed it the Broadway Theatre.  In a 1976 press conference, Palace Theatre operator Lee Harper complained bitterly of persecution, made acusations of police brutality, threatened the life of a local judge, and accused the LDS Church of being involved with the assassinations of John F. Kennedy and Martin Luthar King.

 
 
  Home   »  Theaters   »  Young's Theatre  »  Main Page
   
 
The west and south exterior walls.

Photographer: Grant Smith
Date: 10 June 2011

Young's Theatre
(Young's Theatre, Young's Opera House)
 
275 South Main Street
Monticello, Utah
 
Status:
Closed 
Open:
Before 1922  
Closed:
About 1931  
 

A. J. Young operated a theater or hall in Monticello from about 1922 to 1927.[1]

Frank Spearman, son of Dr. F. S. Spearman, leased the Young Theatre in May 1930, after becoming “familiar with the operation of picture machines” while working at the theater during the previous year. The San Juan Record reported that he was “able to handle the projection end of the business very satisfactorily” and wished him a “very liberal patronage.”[2]

The Young Theatre had sat idle for “two or three years” when it was purchased in May 1934 by Marie M. Ogden for use as a “community house.” After “considerable renovating and repairing”, the former show hall was to be “a place for her people to stop for rest while considering their future activities” in the county.[3]

Ogden led a band of religious settlers who established the Home of Truth settlement in Dry Valley in September 1933. She gained notoriety after one of her followers, Edith Peshak, died of cancer on 11 February 1935. Ogden claimed Peshak had not died and for two years her followers washed Peshak's body in a salt solution three times daily. After the sheriff forced an investigation and found the body perfectly preserved, Ogden secretly cremated the remains.[4]


1. Polk's Utah Gazetteer and Business Directory, 1922-1923, 1927-1928
2. "Frank Spearman Takes over Young Theatre", San Juan Record, 22 May 1930, page 1
3 "Theatre Building Bought", San Juan Record, 10 May 1934, page 5
4. “Marie Ogden Led Spiritual Group in San Juan County”, History Blazer, April 1995