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Goff's Opera House
730 West Center Street
Midvale, Utah  84047
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Dreamland Theatre
Ogden, Utah

Charles and George Driskell were managers of the Dreamland Theatre on Washington Avenue for most of 1908.   They made improvements to the playhouse in March, including the addition of landscape panels on the walls made by local artists.   In August, the Dreamland added a second projector, eliminating the need for intermissions at reel changes.   A claim by George Driskell that he had “worked with untiring energy” to secure exclusive engagements at the Dreamland provoked a strong response from R. W. Strong with 20th Century Optiscope, who claimed the entire credit for resolving booking conflicts lay with the national Film Service Association.   Two months later, the Dreamland reopened under the management of Fred Tout and Fred Anderson.

 
 
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'This is the general store in Midvale, Utah, started by Hyrum Goff and taken over by his son Clifford Isaac Goff as a mortuary.  Many plays and activities were had in the upper room of the store.'

Goff's Opera House
(Goff's Opera House, Goff's Dramatic Hall)
 
730 West Center Street
Midvale, Utah 84047
 
Status:
Demolished 
Total Seats:
400 
Open:
1891  
Closed:
After 1918  
 

Goff’s Opera House occupied the second floor of the Goff Mercantile and was reached by an enclosed, external staircase.  The mercantile opened in 1891, replacing a store built in 1872 by Hyrum’s father, Isaac, and his mother-in-law, Clarissa Arnold.  The first floor was converted into a mortuary in 1915 and the building was extensively remodeled in 1954.  A new mortuary was built in 1954 at 8090 South State Street.[1]

An evening of entertainment at Goff's Dramatic Hall in 1899, presented by the Lafayette Memorial committee, was attended by an audience of about 400.[5]

Polk’s Utah Gazetteer listed Goff’s Dramatic Hall as being in West Jordan in 1903, with Hyrum Goff as manager.[2]  By 1918, West Jordan had come to known by its present name of Midvale and the theater was known as Goff’s Opera House.[3]

The theater was 34 feet wide, according to the 1911 Sanborn fire insurance map, with a stage, scenery, and a 16-foot high ceiling.[4]

 
1. “Isaac Goff”, familysearch.org, retrieved June 2014
2. Polk's Utah Gazetteer and Business Directory, 1903-1904
3. Polk's Utah Gazetteer and Business Directory, 1918-1919
4. “Midvale, 1911: Sheet 04”, J. Willard Marriott Library, retrieved June 2014
5. "Entertainment at Goff's Dramatic Hall", 26 February 1899, Salt Lake Tribune, page 9