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Egyptian Theatre
328 Main Street
Park City, Utah  84060
435-649-9371
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Vogue Theatre
Vernal, Utah

The Vernal Amusement and Improvement Company opened the Vogue Theatre on 29 December 1916, with Mary Pickford starring in Poor Little Peppina.  The Vogue was described as “the most modern moving picture show house in the Basin,” boasting features “right up to the minute.”   The 425-seat theater had a balcony and a 17-instrument Wurlizter Plan Orchestra organ.   The original name intended for the theater was “Princess,” but was changed to the “Vogue” after the management held a contest to find “the most catching name, with the least number of letters.”   The Vogue Theatre closed in 1960 and was remodeled for use as the Vernal Drug Company.

 
 
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Front of the Egyptian Theatre from across the street.

Photographer: Grant Smith
Date: 6 July 2002

Egyptian Theatre
(Silver Wheel Theatre)
 
328 Main Street
Park City, Utah 84060
435-649-9371
http://www.egyptiantheatrecompany.org/
 
Status:
Open 
Total Seats:
266 
Open:
1926  
 
"Egyptian Theatre Company (ETC) is in residence at the historic Mary G Steiner Egyptian Theatre. Built in 1926 shortly after the discovery of King Tutankhamen's tomb, the Egyptian Theatre is a replica of Wamer's Egyptian Theatre in Pasadena, California and is one of only two Egyptian-revival buildings in Utah. "The theatre was originally designed to accommodate "talkies" and traveling vaudeville shows. In 1981, Egyptian Theatre Company (then Park City Performances) converted it into a live theatre venue. In 1984, it was awarded a historic building designation by the Park City Centennial Commission and underwent a $1.5 million renovation in 1998." (http://www.egyptiantheatrecompany.org/2002season/topbarpages/2_about/page.html)

In the early 1900's Park City's social and entertainment needs were served by a number of flourishing theaters and social halls. When the Dewey Theater, originally on this site, collapsed under a heavy snow load, John Rugar replaced it with the Egyptian Theater built in 1926. It was designed to seat 400 and to accommodate both movies and vaudeville. It became the first "sound movie" theater in Park City.

After being remodeled in 1963, the building opened as the Silver Wheel Theater, and old fashioned "meller dramas" were performed for the next fifteen years. In 1978 the building's architectural integrity was threatened by an attempt to change its facade to a western motif. Preservation of its distinctive Egyptian features was achieved, however, when the building became the home of Park City Performances in 1981.

The Egyptian Revival Style represents a unique period architecture which peaked in America around 1930. Egyptian theaters are rare, and this is one of only two remaining in Utah. Originally the interior contained replicas of Egyptian artifacts. This is a masonry structure with a false front shielding its hip roof. Tiles at the base of the ticket booth and pilasters in obelisk shape reinforce the Egyptian motif.

(From a historical marker presented by the Park City Centennial Commission)